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Wrigley Memorial and Botanical Gardens

In homage to Catalina Island's former owner, William Wrigley Jr., who lived from 1861 to 1932, Wrigley Memorial Garden features a hilltop centerpiece made of quarried Catalina stones in reinforced concrete, blue flagstone rock on the ramps and terraces acquired from the island's Little Harbor,

 the Botanical Garden.

The Wrigley Memorial and Botanical Garden is 1 miles up Avalon Canyon Road. The walk is pleasant, passing the 9-hole Golf Course, a ballpark, horse ss and the Hermit Gulch campground. But on an arid summer day, you may want to rent a golf cart and drive to the Gardens as part of your tour of the Island. Golf carts are available for rental to adults per availability.
With commanding view of Avalon Bay, the Wrigley Memorial is the It was built in 1933-34 with the goal of using as much Catalina materials as possible.  -- the facade having been sandblasted to hide the cement and highlight the native crushed stones.

The  on Catalina's "back" side. And the red roof tiles and all the colorful handmade glazed tiles used for finishings came from the Catalina Pottery plant, which was in operation from 1927 to 1937. The marble inside the tower was quarried in Georgia.

showcases plants that grow naturally only on Santa Catalina Island. There are eight Catalina endemics catalogued and now maintained under the direction of the Wrigley Memorial Garden Foundation. These include a rare Catalina Ironwood. The Garden's emphasis on California island endemic plants that grow naturally on one or more of the California islands, but nowhere else in the world, ) Many of these plants are extremely rare, and some are on the Endangered Species list. In 1969, the Wrigley Memorial Garden Foundation expanded and revitalized the garden's 37+ acres. Along with the new plantings came a new attitude. In the same way that the Wrigley Memorial uses primarily native building materials, Note: In 1996, the Wrigley Memorial Garden Foundation merged with the Catalina Island Conservancy. In 1935, Ada Wrigley (William's wife), contracted and supervised Pasadena horticulturalist Albert Conrad to plant a Desert Plant Collection. Ada came up with the idea of creating a garden in this perfect location―Santa Catalina Island's temperate marine climate made it possible to showcase plants from every corner of the earth.

 Although best known as the founder of the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, largest manufacturer of chewing gum in the world, he also played an instrumental role in the history of Santa Catalina Island. He loved the Catalina Island and helped build the infrastructure for this thriving region of Los Angeles County. Public utilities, the Casino building, a hotel and transportation to the island were part of his island legacy. But William Wrigley Jr. would not rest until his vision was set in place--Santa Catalina Island was to remain ecologically-protected for all generations to enjoy. Not to be confused with Wrigley's other assets spread around the nation, including Tournament (of Roses) House and Wrigley Gardens at 391 South Orange Grove Boulevard, Pasadena, his Catalina Island Botanical Gardens require a boat trip, a cruise vacation or flight to the island to enjoy. While this botanic garden exists as one of Los Angeles County's most remote to access, the visit is well worth one day of your time (1-hour boat excursions leave daily from Long Beach, San Pedro, Newport Beach and Dana Point). One of the most natural gardens you'll find in the L.A. region includes desert cactus, succulents with seasonal flower blooms and plants that thrive in Southern California's desert atmosphere. While visitors often believe that Southern California is a lush paradise similar to Hawaii, in reality the region receives an average annual rainfall of 10 to 12 inches and in a natural state, appears somewhat earthy and rugged. Dry, yet often cool and moist climate of an island make this geographic region unique for growing a variety of flowers and plants.

Hours and Directions

Persons with disabilities may arrange for assistance when visiting this facility by calling (310) 510-2288.

Hours
The Garden is open daily from 8a.m to 5p.m., year round.

Admission
Admission is free to Catalina Island Conservancy Members.
Adult Admission is $5, children under 12 are free.

Getting There
The Wrigley Memorial and Botanical Garden is one and one-half miles up Avalon Canyon Road. The walk is pleasant, passing the Golf Course, the town's ballpark, and the Hermit Gulch campground.

The Wrigley Memorial honors the memory of William Wrigley Jr., who lived from 1861 to 1932. Although best known as the founder of the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, largest manufacturer of chewing gum in the world, he also played an instrumental role in the history of Catalina Island. He truly loved the island, and with undying enthusiasm and energy, he brought numerous improvements: public utilities, new steamships, a hotel, The Casino building, and extensive plantings of trees, shrubs and flowers. William Wrigley Jr.'s greatest legacy was his remarkable vision and plan for the future of Catalina Island -- that it remain protected for all generations to enjoy.

With its commanding view of Avalon Bay, The Wrigley Memorial is the centerpiece of the Botanical Garden. It was built in 1933-34 with the goal of using as much Catalina materials as possible. Quarried Catalina stones can be seen in the reinforced concrete construction -- the facade having been sandblasted to hide the cement and highlight the native crushed stones.

The blue flagstone rock on the ramps and terraces comes from Little Harbor, on Catalina's "back" side. And the red roof tiles and all the colorful handmade glazed tiles used for finishings came from the Catalina Pottery plant, which was in operation from 1927 to 1937. The marble inside the tower was quarried in Georgia.


The idea for a garden came from Mr. Wrigley's wife, Ada. In 1935, she supervised Pasadena horticulturalist Albert Conrad, who planted the original Desert Plant Collection. Catalina Island's temperate marine climate made it possible to showcase plants from every corner of the earth.

In 1969, the Wrigley Memorial Garden Foundation expanded and revitalized the garden's 37.85 acres. Along with the new plantings came a new attitude. In the same way that the Wrigley Memorial uses primarily native building materials, the Garden places a special emphasis on California island endemic plants. (Plants, which grow naturally on one or more of the California islands, but nowhere else in the world.) Many of these plants are extremely rare, and some are on the Endangered Species list.

The Memorial Garden is particularly concerned with the six Catalina endemics - plants, which grow naturally only on Catalina Island. The Wrigley Memorial Garden Foundation maintains a special interest in the preservation of all Catalina endemics, including the rare Catalina Ironwood.

In 1996 the Wrigley Memorial Garden Foundation merged with the Catalina Island Conservancy. This was a natural combining of two important ecological organizations, both dedicated to the protection and restoration of Santa Catalina Island.


Hours
The Gardens are open daily from 8a.m. to 5p.m., year round.

Admission
Adult Admission is $5, children under 12 are free.

Getting There
The Memorial and Gardens are one and a half miles up Avalon Canyon Road. The walk is pleasant, passing the Golf Course, the town's ballpark, and the Hermit Gulch campground.

Catalina Island Conservancy
P.O. Box 2739
Avalon, CA 90704
(310) 510-2595

Things to do include riding the zip line attraction


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